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Posts Tagged ‘Gluten’

35/365: Clean out refrigerator

Time to clean out the refrigerator

This is the second in a series of what to do when you discover you can no longer eat gluten.

One of the first steps in living a gluten free life is identifying the foods in your house that you no longer can eat. If you are single or are in a household which will be going gluten free with you, take items you can’t eat and throw them away if they have been opened, and consider donating unopened foods to a local food bank. Otherwise, designate top shelves for gluten free items, and lower shelves for gluten containing items in your pantry if you are sharing food with someone who isn’t eating a gluten free diet.

Easily Assumed Safe Foods

Safe foods are single ingredient foods that are not processed. Raw vegetables and fruits of any variety, nuts, milk, cottage cheese, cream, and butter (real butter, not the fakes), Raw meats that have undergone no processing are also safe to keep. You can safely keep fresh eggs, cheese, dried fruits, peas, beans, pulses, rice, sugar, honey. molasses and most vinegars. Millet, buckwheat, flax seed and quinoa are safe grains. Olive oil, coconut oil are good safe oils. Other vegetable oils are gluten free as well. Baking soda and powder are also naturally gluten free.

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This is the first in a series of what to do when you discover you can no longer eat gluten.

There are two ways to figure out that gluten can’t be a part of your diet anymore.  Either you get a diagnosis, or you try an elimination diet and discover that many of your issues are resolving.  No matter which way you figure it out, its bound to affect you emotionally.

A few days ago, I got a comment from a friend on one of my social networks who had read my post about “Getting Glutened“. In that comment, my friend said.

Ok, this blog just scared me. Half the symptoms she was relating – joint pain, tooth enamel issues, IBS, and a few of the others, I have all the time. I can’t imagine having to be gluten free, it would eliminate more than half my diet. I don’t eat many veggies because I don’t like them and while I’ve made some progress in learning to like some of them, I still don’t eat enough. If I have to go gluten free for health reasons, I think I’ll starve to death!

This is a fairly common reaction, both the visceral, “What would I eat” to “How can I give up the things I like”.  Even when we have the aches and pains that might be resolved by changing our diets, we resist. Its human nature to resist change. The idea of giving up foods that we like and that we are familiar with is frightening.

So you have a choice.  And in many ways its a simple one. Do you choose to try to change your diet to better your health, or do you continue down the same road you are on already, eating foods that you know might be harming you, complaining about that and not doing anything to change? (more…)

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Eating is often a social occasion.

Eating is most often a social occasion. When you can't eat what everyone else eats, its a very lonely feeling.

A few weeks ago, I got glutened. It was my own fault, I wasn’t the advocate that I should have been when my boyfriend and I went out to a chain restaurant for a quick breakfast before we went camping. Once we were there, I mentioned to the waitress that I was gluten intolerant and asked that there be no bread on the plate. I ordered what I thought was a safe meal: two eggs over easy, bacon and hash browns. I was hungry, and ate it all. This restaurant specializes in pancakes and advertises that they use pancake batter in their omelets, so I made sure to not order an omelette.) I now think that I was a victim of cross contamination and that they cooked something (most likely the hash browns) on a part of the griddle that they did the pancakes or omelettes on (like I said, my own fault for not specifying a clean grill area). We then drove to the camp ground and set up our tent city (Large tent and a large pop up which acts as our kitchen). Set up takes about 3 hours, which is why we tend to go for longer trips (this one was 6 days).

The next day I woke up to mild stomach cramping. The entire day was spent running into the restroom and trying to convince myself that this was an abberation and that I hadn’t been glutened. By Friday, the stomach cramps were so bad that I had to admit it to myself. I was angry, but mostly at myself. I know that chain restaurants are absolutely the worst for cross contamination, and I still went. (more…)

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