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Posts Tagged ‘Food’

35/365: Clean out refrigerator

Time to clean out the refrigerator

This is the second in a series of what to do when you discover you can no longer eat gluten.

One of the first steps in living a gluten free life is identifying the foods in your house that you no longer can eat. If you are single or are in a household which will be going gluten free with you, take items you can’t eat and throw them away if they have been opened, and consider donating unopened foods to a local food bank. Otherwise, designate top shelves for gluten free items, and lower shelves for gluten containing items in your pantry if you are sharing food with someone who isn’t eating a gluten free diet.

Easily Assumed Safe Foods

Safe foods are single ingredient foods that are not processed. Raw vegetables and fruits of any variety, nuts, milk, cottage cheese, cream, and butter (real butter, not the fakes), Raw meats that have undergone no processing are also safe to keep. You can safely keep fresh eggs, cheese, dried fruits, peas, beans, pulses, rice, sugar, honey. molasses and most vinegars. Millet, buckwheat, flax seed and quinoa are safe grains. Olive oil, coconut oil are good safe oils. Other vegetable oils are gluten free as well. Baking soda and powder are also naturally gluten free.

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This is the first in a series of what to do when you discover you can no longer eat gluten.

There are two ways to figure out that gluten can’t be a part of your diet anymore.  Either you get a diagnosis, or you try an elimination diet and discover that many of your issues are resolving.  No matter which way you figure it out, its bound to affect you emotionally.

A few days ago, I got a comment from a friend on one of my social networks who had read my post about “Getting Glutened“. In that comment, my friend said.

Ok, this blog just scared me. Half the symptoms she was relating – joint pain, tooth enamel issues, IBS, and a few of the others, I have all the time. I can’t imagine having to be gluten free, it would eliminate more than half my diet. I don’t eat many veggies because I don’t like them and while I’ve made some progress in learning to like some of them, I still don’t eat enough. If I have to go gluten free for health reasons, I think I’ll starve to death!

This is a fairly common reaction, both the visceral, “What would I eat” to “How can I give up the things I like”.  Even when we have the aches and pains that might be resolved by changing our diets, we resist. Its human nature to resist change. The idea of giving up foods that we like and that we are familiar with is frightening.

So you have a choice.  And in many ways its a simple one. Do you choose to try to change your diet to better your health, or do you continue down the same road you are on already, eating foods that you know might be harming you, complaining about that and not doing anything to change? (more…)

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A Little Peace of Mind

I’ve been canning for about three years now. During that time, I get looks of puzzlement when people ask me what my hobbies are and I reply “canning”. People tend to relate canning to frugality and most of them have decided that canning just doesn’t save enough money for the time and effort it takes.

I don’t do it for the frugality, though I think I actually spend less on the actual ingredients and tools than I would on buying the equivalents, I do it for a number of reasons.

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Preserved food in Mason jars

I’m a freely admitted control freak. Not in every way, but in a very important way.  I want to know and control where my food comes from.  The more I learn about the food industry and what they actually sell as “food”, the less and less I choose to spend my food dollars there.

About 3 years ago, I decided to embark on an experiment, to see how well I could do buying and eating foods that were local and seasonal.  I decided this in the winter, after reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle.  I knew that in order to conduct this experiment, I would have to preserve foods during the summer for winter as well.  I wasn’t going to go as whole hog as the people who wrote the 100-Mile Diet.  I wasn’t going to give up coffee or chocolate and if I couldn’t buy locally, I would try buying seasonally (which meant that winter, I ate a lot of turnips, rutabagas and chard).  I found farms where I could buy grass fed meats, chickens and eggs as well.  I also signed up for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture).  Most of this however wouldn’t happen in the spring. (more…)

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